Cookies

Like most websites, ours uses cookies to improve the way it shows you things, and to make access easier for you. Cookies are small files of letters or numbers that, with your permission, we put on your computer. Some stay on it for a while, others disappear the minute you close the browser.

Here are the three types of cookies we use to help improve your experience on our Website:

Session cookies are like a token which records things like pages viewed as you move through the Website, so you don’t keep getting asked about things you’ve already told us. Session cookies (and the information they record) are erased when you close your browser after a browsing session.

Tracking cookies help us remember your details and settings for when you come back to our website in the future, which means you get easier, faster access. They stay on your hard drive until you delete them or they expire. They have various expiry dates, up to two years.

Web analytics cookies help us learn what content is most helpful for our users. They count the number of visitors, and then look at how they like to move around the Website. This data helps us make your experience of the website much better because we’ll know the sort of things you look for and can make sure you find them easily.

No Personal Information Stored: Remember, our cookies don’t store information that can identify you, so no one will be able to use the information gathered by the cookies to contact you by phone, email or in any other way. Tracking is limited to the Website and never gets shared with anyone else. A full list of the cookies we use on the Website can be found at the end of this policy.

Blocking Cookies: You can block cookies – just activate the setting on your browser that allows you to refuse them.

Acceptance of cookies: If your browser is set to accept cookies, our system will issue them when you visit the Website.

WordPress

On login, wordpress uses the wordpress_[hash] cookie to store your authentication details. Its use is limited to the admin console area, /wp-admin/. After login, wordpress sets the wordpressloggedin_[hash] cookie, which indicates when you’re logged in, and who you are, for most interface use. WordPress also sets a few wp-settings-{time}-[UID] cookies. The number on the end is your individual user ID from the users database table. This is used to customize your view of admin interface, and possibly also the main site interface.

Non-Version-Specific Data The actual cookies contain hashed data, so you don’t have to worry about someone gleaning your username and password by reading the cookie data. A hash is the result of a specific mathematical formula applied to some input data (in this case your user name and password, respectively). It’s quite hard to reverse a hash (bordering on practical infeasibility with today’s computers). This means it is very difficult to take a hash and “unhash” it to find the original input data.

 

Cloudflare

__CFDUID

The __cfduid cookie is used to identify individual clients behind a shared IP address and apply security settings on a per-client basis. It does not correspond to any user ID in your web application, and does not store any personally identifiable information.

 

Google Analytics

_GA

Used to distinguish users.

 

_GID

Used to distinguish users.

 

_GAT

Used to throttle request rate. If Google Analytics is deployed via Google Tag Manager, this cookie will be named _dc_gtm_<property-id> .

 

AMP_TOKEN

Contains a token that can be used to retrieve a Client ID from AMP Client ID service. Other possible values indicate opt-out, inflight request or an error retrieving a Client ID from AMP Client ID service.

 

_GAC_<PROPERTY-ID>

Contains campaign related information for the user. If you have linked your Google Analytics and AdWords accounts, AdWords website conversion tags will read this cookie unless you opt-out.